The Hydrological Cycle (Water Cycle) PDF Print E-mail

 


hydro

 

The science of hydrology deals with the occurrence and distribution of Hydrocycle waters of Earth, including their chemical, biological and physical properties, and their interaction with the physical environment. Hydrological data and information are used as the basis for solving practical problems of floods and droughts, erosion and sediment transport, and water pollution. Hydrology plays a central role in many environmental initiatives that address concerns on the increasing pollution of surface and ground waters, acid rain, drainage of wetlands and various other type of land-use change, together with the impending threats to fresh water resources posed by climate change and sea-level rise.

 

The Water Vapor - The water cycle is the process by which water moves around, through, and above the Earth, continually changing from liquid water to water vapor and ice. The evolution of water through the cycle involves a number of phase changes and interactions that depend primarily on the absorption of solar energy.


Sunshine - Solar radiation falls on water in rivers, lakes, streams, wetlands and oceans and makes the water warmer. This converts the water into vapor or steam. The water vapor then moves into the air, increasing the moisture content of the lower atmosphere.


Evaporation - The conversion of liquid water to vapor is called evaporation. The water vapor or steam leaves the stream, river, lake or ocean and ascends into the air, where it gradually expands, cools and condenses to form clouds. Evaporation occurs from open water surfaces, the top layer of soils and through the leaves of plants and vegetation. This latter process is known as transpiration. The combination of evaporation and transpiration from vegetation surfaces is referred to as evapo-transpiration.


Rain - When the temperature is warm, the concentration of water droplets in clouds increase, and the clouds grow vertical extent and girth. As the cloud droplets cool and increase in size, rain starts to fall. The rains fall onto the land and runs into streams and rivers. The water in the streams and rivers runs into lakes and finally into the ocean. Some of the rain that falls soaks into the ground and stays there until plants absorb it or until it goes deep enough into the ground that it is called “groundwater” and goes to people’s wells.


Snow - Snow is similar to rain except it falls when the air is cold, like during late fall and winter in maid and high latitude regions of both hemisphere. Snow usually stays on top of the ground until it melts, then it turns into water and runs into streams and rivers. Some of the water from melted snow also goes into the ground and become groundwater. Generally ground water moves very, very slowly towards the ocean and may take hundreds of years to reach the ocean.

 --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

  

HYDROLOGICAL MONITORING NETWORK

STATION CODE

LOCALITY

WATERCOURSE

TYPE OF MONITORING

LATITUDE

LONGITUDE

STATION TYPE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8901

Double Run

Belize River

River Levels

17o37’04”

-88o22’54”

Manual

8902

Big Falls North

Belize River

River Levels

17o29’54”

-88o34’54”

Automatic

8903

Freetown Sibun

Sibun River

River Levels

17o25’39”

-88o21’12”

Manual

8905

Banana Bank

Belize River

River Levels

17o17”15”

-88o46’37”

Automatic

8906

Benque Viejo

Mopan River

River Levels

17o04’26”

-89o08’29”

Manual

8907

San Ignacio

Macal River

River Levels

17o09’19”

-89o04’11”

Manual

8913

Kendal

Sittee River

River Levels

16 o48'52"

-88 o22'43"

Manual

8914

Big Falls South

Rio Grande

River Levels/ Rainfall

16 o 15'23"

-88 o53'10"

Manual

8915

Blue Creek South

Moho River

River Levels

16 o11'51"

-89 o02'27"

Manual

8917

Jordan

Moho River

River Levels

16 o09'45"

-89 o 02'51"

Manual

8920

Blue Creek North

Rio Hondo

River Levels

17 o53'44"

-88 o55'49"

Manual

8921

Douglas

Rio Hondo

River Levels

18 o36'31"

-88 o36'31"

Manual

8922

Caledonia

New River

River Levels

18 o13'07"

-88 o28'11"

Manual

8927

San Pedro Columbia

Rio Grande

River Levels

16 o16'22"

-89 o57'18"

Manual

8928

Crooked Tree

CT Lagoon, Bze

River Levels

17 o46'45"

-88 o32' 7"

Manual

8930

Gales Point

Manatee lagoon

River Levels/ Rainfall

17 o11'53"

-88 o20'28"

Manual

8931

Tower Hill

New River

River Levels

18 o08'08"

-88 o33'36"

Manual

8933

Swasey

Monkey River

River Levels

16 o31'18"

-88 o34' 1"

Manual

8934

Bladen

Monkey River

River Levels

16 o28'21"

-88 o38'24"

Manual

8938

Hellgate

Golden Stream

River Levels

16 o22'06"

-88 o48'20"

Manual

8960

Medina Bank

Deep River

River Levels

16 o26'56"

-88 o45'56"

Manual

8975

Chaa Creek

Macal River

River Levels

 

 

Manual

8985

San Antonio

Rio Hondo

River Levels

18 o07'48"

-88 o40'23"

Manual

8986

San Roman

Rio Hondo

River Levels

18 o11'22"

-88 o38'32"

Manual

8987

Santa Cruz

Rio Hondo

River Levels

18 o06'49"

-88 o42'35"

Manual

8988

Isabella Bank

Belize River

River Levels

 

 

Automatic

8989

Santa Familia

Belize River

River Levels

 

 

Automatic

8990

Crique Sarco

Temash River

River Levels

 

 

Manual

 

 

 -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

BELIZE WATERSHED BOUNDARIES

alt